Port Eliza Lodge,                     Vancouver Island B.C., Canada

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About Port Eliza Lodge

Drive-in or Fly-in

packages available

Video Courtesy of Coleman Gamble

Port Eliza Lodge is a floating fishing lodge located in Esperanza Inlet on the wild west coast of Vancouver Island, right in the middle of some of the best Salmon and Halibut fishing in North America. Our Lodge features 24 comfortable double or triple occupancy rooms with bathrooms that are either private, or shared with one other room. The bathrooms all have running water and hot water showers. Port Eliza Lodge features an indoor lounge area as well as a huge outdoor deck area to enjoy your favorite beverage and swap fish stories with your fellow fishers. Wifi and telephone service is available at the lodge in case you want to stay in touch with the outside world! This beautiful area, teeming with wildlife, boasts a mild summer climate in the protected inlet that is your base while visiting us.  While it can always rain on the west coast (we have plenty of rain gear if it does) the summers are generally dry and pleasant.

Why Choose Port Eliza Lodge

Location, Location, Location!

The Fishing

Spectatcular fishing is what Port Eliza Lodge is all about

Salmon

While all 5 species of pacific Salmon travel past the lodge, the premier target is the Chinook, or King Salmon. The heavy-weights of the pacific salmon species, they provide the chance of landing a Tyee, a Chinook over 30 lbs. Abundant runs of Coho, or silver salmon also travel past the Lodge. Our location is designed to intercept runs of migrating salmon headed to California, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia. We are also able to take advantage of the prolific runs of Salmon heading back to the local Robertson Creek and Canuma River hatcheries that come close to shore to feed. Salmon limits are generous, with 4 per day and 8 per trip allowed per person, of which 2 per day and 4 per trip may be Chinook.

The premier sport fish on the west coast

Halibut

Arguably the best  table fish on the west coast

The offshore areas around the lodge are prime grounds for the Pacific Halibut. This member of the flatfish family can grow to enormous sizes, sometimes hundreds of pounds. These "barn door" specimens are breeding females, and are not allowed to be harvested to ensure enough eggs survive to replenish the stocks, but you may be lucky enough to catch and release one of these monster fish. For 2019 Regulations allow the retention of one halibut up to 126cm (about 60lbs) , or two halibut up to 90cm each (about 20lbs). This limit protects the large breeding fish, but still allows for some tasty halibut fillets to be taken home.

Ling Cod and other bottom fish

They are ugly but make great fish and chips

Lingcod are large, aggressive, bottom dwelling fish. They are characterized by a very large head and elongated body.  For 2019 the limit is 2 per person per day, and 4 per trip.  Rockfish of various species are also plentiful near the lodge, and the limit for 2019 is 3 per day and 6 per trip. New for 2019, all rockfish not being retained need to be returned to depth using a descending device. 

At Port Eliza Lodge location means being close to the fish. Our lodge exists to provide easy access to the best salmon, halibut and bottom fishing on the west coast. At Port Eliza you will spend less time running to the grounds and more time fishing! The scenery is spectacular, and up close encounters with Killer Whales, Humpbacks, Gray Whales, Otters, Sea Lions and Bears are a bonus. Only Port Eliza Lodge offers a unique combination of a pristine wilderness setting and fantastic fishing without the necessity of flying in*. Part of the adventure is getting here, as you drive through the temperate rainforest to the village of Tahsis B.C., where we pick you up and complete the journey by boat, motoring through the mountain framed Tahsis and Esperanza inlets.

*Fly in options are available from Seattle and Campbell River. Details are in the Getting Here section